Spring is in the air!  The sun is shining, the birds are chirping, the kids are merrily playing, and then it starts………. the first “AH-CHOO!!!”     Many adults and children suffer from springtime allergies due to the rising mold and pollen counts in March, April and May. 
With the weather being so nice it is impossible to resist enjoying the beautiful outdoors!  Even children that suffer from seasonal allergies should be able to play outside and to revel in what nature has to offer.  For most kids, seasonal allergies cause mild symptoms such as runny nose, congestion, throat clearing and itchy eyes.  But for some, allergies can lead to other complications such as acute sinusitis and asthma exacerbations.  Therefore, we must take steps to protect our children affected by seasonal allergies.   
Here are some natural tips to reduce allergy symptoms:  

  • Pollen counts are often highest in the morning.  Therefore, it is best to stay indoors in the morning and save outdoor play for the late afternoon or evening when pollen levels are lower.
  • Keep windows in your home and car closed.  Use air conditioners to cool down instead of fans.  
  • Take shoes off at the door and encourage guests to do the same.  This limits the amount of grass and pollen dragged through the house.
  • Do not line dry clothes outside. 
  • If your child’s eyes are particularly affected, wear glasses or sunglasses outside to keep pollen out of their eyes.
  • Keep children inside when mowing the lawn.  If you have allergies and need to mow the lawn wear a mask. 
  • Do not allow pets to sleep in the bed with your children.   They drag pollens and grass into your bed.  
  • Shower after playing outside or before bedtime.  Make sure to also wash their hair and to change into fresh new clothes. 
  • If your child’s symptoms are not controlled by environmental modifications, please let us know at your next visit and we can discuss how to further reduce his/her allergies.  


Written by Deborah Boyle MD

“Common seasonal allergy triggers.” American college of allergy, asthma and immunology.  2014.Web. 20 Jun 2016. http://acaai.org/allergies/types/seasonal.

“How to control your seasonal allergies.”  National Institutes of Health Medline plus. Spring 2013 Issue: Volume 8 Number 1 Page 22-23 https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/magazine/issues/spring13/articles/spring13pg22-23.html

“Allergy Tips.” American Academy of Pediatrics. 01 Sep 2015. Web. 20 Jun 2016.
https://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/news-features-and-safety-tips/Pages/Allergy-Tips.aspx

 

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